Working Together Against COVID-19 in Multifamily Housing

We must work together to mitigate—to reduce the harm, illness and deathsthat COVID-19 threatens to bring to our housing community. Our success depends on a coordinated effort where everyone works together: landlord/housing authority, management, custodians, social workers, and tenants.

Gossip & Bullying in the Time of COVID

Bonny Zeh, co-founder of the Stop Bullying Coalition, shares her observations and ideas.—JH

Gossip and bullying not only target people in public and subsidized housing but also inhibit the essential collaboration needed to protect everyone from COVID. Gossip and bullying together are a contagious social disease that destroys trust and drives us apart from each other. Together, we can find a way to overcome these barriers so all of us can survive this plague.

Learning Origami During COVID

NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab: Origami Unfolds in Space

Origami is a great, inexpensive hobby. I've been folding seriously since the COVID-19 pandemic took hold. I fold at the high intermediate level. My models are nice enough that I can gift them. I like origami because I can give someone something nice and I don't worry about what happens to it. After all, it's just paper... and I can replace it fairly quickly.

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The Little Red Hen Method for Fighting COVID

The Little Red Hen, illustation by Florence White Williams
Tenants in public and subsidized housing for elderly and disabled, as well as market rate and affordable housing, are vulnerable to an outbreak of COVID-19. Once COVID-19 gets into our residence, it can spread like wildfire. To stop an infectious disease like COVID-19, we need to know where it is. But no agency is looking, no agency is guiding landlords and tenants. Like the Little Red Hen, it is up to us. We'll do it. Please join us!

Editorial: Let's Protect Elderly & Disabled Tenants from COVID-19

Storm clouds loom over apartment building
In Essex County, there are unofficial reports of current cases of COVID-related deaths and illness in public and subsidized housing. This as just the beginning of what can swiftly become a statewide disaster unless there is rapid and immediate implementation of protocols based on best practices and enforcement of public health rulings. For this, we need new legislation.